[Timezone Detection]
Create Account - Join in Seconds!

User Name: Email Address:
Human Verification

What type of fish is in the middle of CaptiveReefs (top left corner of page...hint it is the main character in Finding Nemo) )

Cycling tank with raw shrimp


Bookmark and Share
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    CR Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Howell Michigan
    Posts
    47

    Default Cycling tank with raw shrimp

    I started my cycling on my tank at the beginning of this week using a piece of raw shrimp. The rock that I usd was dried although it had been used by another reefer. Between the organics on the rock and the shrimp that I added I have been getting readings on ammonia and nitrites. I started adding my saltwater to the tank on 4/7 and finished filling it on 4/8. On Monday 4/9 I added my piece of raw shrimp. I decided to go ahead and test my water to give me a base line on where I was starting. Ammonia was 1.0ppm Nitrite was 0.5ppm, did not test on nitrates. On 4/10 test results were Ammonia 2.0ppm Nitrite 1.0ppm, I also have what I believe to be a bacterial bloom that started white hazy cloudy water. From my experience in fw this is usually a bacterial bloom. On 4/11 test results were the same as the day before. Today 4/12 my test results are Ammonia 4.0ppm Nitrite 2.0ppm and I tested on Nitrates and got a reading of 20ppm. What I am wondering is if I should leave the piece of shrimp in for a little longer and let my ammonia and nitrites get a little bit higher before pulling it out, or go ahead and pull it out?

    Also another question that I have is that my pH has been testing consistently at 7.8 since I started testing. I test at about the same time each day, late morning. I noticed from what I have read that most people have their pH above 8. At this time I do not know what my alkalinty is, do not have a test kit for that yet, and from what I remember alkalinty and pH relate to one another higher alkalinity helps to stabilize the pH while with low alkalinity the pH can change. I know that with my fw experience keeping water parameters consistent is more important than having the ideal range. With a pH of 7.8 as along as it is keeping consistent will I be okay with fish and in the future when I am ready to move on with corals will they be fine with a lower pH? Thanks for your suggestions and advice.

  2. #2
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default

    your tanks new, it will be low for a while eventually it will likely sort itself out and be between 8 and 8.4
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  3. #3
    MizTanks - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    U.P. of Michigan.
    Posts
    7,763
    First Name
    Jamie
    Awards Photo of the Month - October 2012 Photo of the Month Post and Reply Award - Winner of the first PAR Contest. Monthly Giveaway Winner

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by redemer123 View Post
    your tanks new, it will be low for a while eventually it will likely sort itself out and be between 8 and 8.4
    How can you determine what her PH is going to be?
    There's nothing like being a Reefer! www.upmmas.com

  4. #4
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default

    Another thing you may want to try is to test later on in the day its good that you are testing at the same time for consistent results. pH will rise throughout the day and fall throughout the night.
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  5. #5
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MizTanks View Post
    How can you determine what her PH is going to be?
    Because im a chemist to be, therefore by using a myriad of complex mathematical equations I can determine where her pH should fall between.
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  6. #6
    CR Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Swartz Creek MI
    Posts
    723
    First Name
    Mike

    Default

    pH is dramatically affected by atmospheric CO2. Have you had your windows open/closed?

    You are correct about alkalinity having an effect on pH as well, it is the buffer that must be controlled to keep you pH consistent.

    Also, with no "life" in the tank, you should not have much of a pH swing yet. Coral and macro algae do go through a respiration cycle, day and night. Once you have a tank and sump going, you can set your sump to be lit opposite of the tank, which will also help stabilize pH swings.

    There are a lot of products on the market that claim to help with pH, in my experience the best was an Aqua Vitro product called.... but I can't recall it at the moment, "Stabil" maybe. It is hydroxide ions in solution. However, you are not to the point of needing to add ANYTHING other then time right now.

    ---------- Post added at 08:47 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:46 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by redemer123 View Post
    Because im a chemist to be, therefore by using a myriad of complex mathematical equations I can determine where her pH should fall between.
    You sir are a dreamer!
    Likes MizTanks liked this post

  7. #7
    CR Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Howell Michigan
    Posts
    47

    Default

    thank you redeemer when I get a chance I will try and see what it is in later on. Not in any rush to do anything and until the tank cycles I am guessing will see a lot if changes.

    As for the shrimp I am thinking that will leave in until the ammonia gets a bit higher.

    Sent from my SCH-R720 using Tapatalk 2

  8. #8
    lngliv3 - Reefkeeper CR Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Toledo Ohio.
    Posts
    70
    First Name
    Tim

    Default

    When I set up my tank i left my shrimp in till it was covered in a cocoon like shell was about 3 days .... Then its a waiting game mine took 24 days for the numbers to come down to 0 across the board... In my opinion on ur ph levels depends what kind of base you have. In my old tank I used crushed aragonite and the water from my ro unit was at 7.8 before I put it in . After a day my ph went up to 8.0 so my thinking is the base helps keep the ph where it needs to be. Thats my opinion...

  9. #9
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default

    Another thing to keep in mind is that if the pH fluctuates just .2 points say from 7.8 to 8.0 thats 10 times more basic and vise versa when it comes to acidity and a one point jump from say 7 to 8 is 50 times more basic so as you can understand even the tiniest of changes in a tanks pH can be significant and is likely felt by your critters. So as you begin to finish the cycle in the near future keep that in mind as you stock the tank with critters, you want your tank rock solid, stability is the key to success. live by that motto if you want a rocking saltwater tank
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  10. #10
    binford4000 - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    farmington hills mi
    Posts
    1,979
    First Name
    Old man
    Awards Tank of the Month - May 2012 Tank of the Month

    Default

    [QUOTE=Poseidon;145055]pH is dramatically affected by atmospheric CO2. Have you had your windows open/closed?

    You are correct about alkalinity having an effect on pH as well, it is the buffer that must be controlled to keep you pH consistent.

    Also, with no "life" in the tank, you should not have much of a pH swing yet. Coral and macro algae do go through a respiration cycle, day and night. Once you have a tank and sump going, you can set your sump to be lit opposite of the tank, which will also help stabilize pH swings.

    There are a lot of products on the market that claim to help with pH, in my experience the best was an Aqua Vitro product called.... but I can't recall it at the moment, "Stabil" maybe. It is hydroxide ions in solution. However, you are not to the point of needing to add ANYTHING other then time right now. [COLOR="Silver"]

    ---------- Post added at 08:47 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:46 PM ----------Well put.

    Well put.the 7.8 will rise but starting a reverse light cycle on the fuge will help keep consitant buffer capabilities. I personally never used the shrimp to cycle a tank.just time and patience but have read of allot of other reefers doing it.Raiseing ammonia is something I never intentionally did.No 2 ,Po4 ,Alk,Ca and No3 levels are usually what I concern myself with once the ammonia reaches 0.
    Likes MizTanks liked this post

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Similar Topics

  1. BRS - Has anyone ever had a mantis shrimp in their tank??
    By BulkReefSupply in forum Bulk Reef Supply
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-09-2013, 03:22 PM
  2. free fish and shrimp tank for sale
    By Medicaldesires in forum Livestock Sales & Trades
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-25-2007, 06:32 PM
  3. Shrimp Through another shrimp in the tank
    By tigersax7 in forum Other Marine Life
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-16-2005, 12:33 PM
  4. Nitrogen Cycle & Phosphate MY TANK HAS FINISHED CYCLING!!!
    By pro2k in forum Chemistry
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 02-25-2005, 12:12 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

About CaptiveReefs

    If you are interested in learning about reefkeeping or have a problem with your reef, our reefkeeping community is here to help. Feel free to ask a question or search our site. We have lots of experienced reefkeepers that are willing to provide free reefkeeping advice!

    Besides being a great resource for all levels of reef aquarium hobbyists, CaptiveReefs is a social experience that will enhance your enjoyment of reefkeeping. CaptiveReefs is committed to connecting reefkeepers with the support and information they need to grow beautiful coral reef aquariums.

Information

Connect with Us