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BRS Bio-Pellets?


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  1. #1
    MizTanks - Reefkeeper
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    Default BRS Bio-Pellets?

    Anyone using these? Have used them?
    There's nothing like being a Reefer! www.upmmas.com

  2. #2
    vega15 - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Anthony
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    Question BRS Bio Pellets...

    Yes I have been using them for about 6 months now with mixed results. I am using a Reef Octopus with about 1 liter of pellets in it on my 200 gallon of water volume system.

    At first I started to see the positive effects in the first month or so. Building up the volume as directed, adding about 1 cup of pellets every 7-14 days. Taking it slow.

    I went from .50 ppm Phosphate down to about .25. Then things kind of planed out. I kept adding pellets to see if I could get lower but never got passed the .25 ppm bar.

    I am not sure what I need to do next to get them going like they should be. I think I have them tumbling right as all of the pellets are moving at a constant rate. In fact I have recently started to turn the flow down some to see if that will help or not. My thought was that maybe by tumbling to fast I was "Scrubbing" off the bacteria? Just a guess really.

    As far as BRS, I am a HUGE fan of all their products as they have never let me down. SO I am still under the assumption that I am doing something wrong in my set up and that I am not maximizing the effect.

    Anyone have any ideas?

    Good luck and thanks!

  3. #3
    binford4000 - Reefkeeper
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    adding the media slowly is a good idea so you do not shock the system.It is my understanding that your present leveling result is normal.Slowing the flow or tumbleing will just slow the bio bacteria growth in the reactor down. in turn slowing down the results.From what I've read it takes a full six to eight weeks to develop the needed bacteria.I just recieved a reactor from BRS and plan to do a full review with results and of the reactor if intrested.I do like the idea of a solid non doased carbon treatment.

  4. #4
    MizTanks - Reefkeeper
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    For whatever reasons I'm having a hard time comprehending the concept of the bio pellets. Does the bacteria actually eat them or what? Why are they better then just a po4 remover? They also sound difficult to use
    There's nothing like being a Reefer! www.upmmas.com

  5. #5
    binford4000 - Reefkeeper
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    Quote Originally Posted by MizTanks View Post
    For whatever reasons I'm having a hard time comprehending the concept of the bio pellets. Does the bacteria actually eat them or what? Why are they better then just a po4 remover? They also sound difficult to use

    Bio Pellets work by providing a solid carbon food source for the denitrifying bacteria so you will need to replenish the media from time to time
    bio pellets are made from 100% natural PHA and are the ideal solid carbon source for denitrifying bacteria in the aquarium short of useing a sulfur nitrate reactor which is more of a complicated advanced method.
    Maintaining low nitrates is key to maintaining the best coral coloration, healthy fish and avoiding algae outbreaks. Fish foods and resulting waste eventually breaks down into nitrates.It's important to rember that bio pelletes are more intended for control of No2 and No3, In my view high capacity GFO in a fluidized reactor is still the best way to reduce and control Phosphates.Hope that helps
    Last edited by binford4000; 11-09-2011 at 10:35 PM.
    Likes Tom Toro, MizTanks liked this post

  6. #6
    MizTanks - Reefkeeper
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    Helps a lot! Thanks Chuck
    There's nothing like being a Reefer! www.upmmas.com

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