[Timezone Detection]
Create Account - Join in Seconds!

User Name: Email Address:
Human Verification

What type of fish is in the middle of CaptiveReefs (top left corner of page...hint it is the main character in Finding Nemo) )

Co2 and Ph?


Bookmark and Share
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    MizTanks - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    U.P. of Michigan.
    Posts
    7,753
    First Name
    Jamie
    Awards Photo of the Month - October 2012 Photo of the Month Post and Reply Award - Winner of the first PAR Contest. Monthly Giveaway Winner

    Default Co2 and Ph?

    What is the relationship between Co2 exchange and Ph?


    There is nothing like being a REEFER!
    There's nothing like being a Reefer! www.upmmas.com

  2. #2
    BeakerBob - Reefkeeper
    RIP

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan
    Posts
    461
    Awards Photo of the Month Photo of the Month

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MizTanks View Post
    What is the relationship between Co2 exchange and Ph?


    There is nothing like being a REEFER!
    The higher the CO2 levels are (in your tank or in the air), the lower the pH may be. CO2 dissolves in water and acidifies it to a lower pH. A lower pH makes it very difficult for the corals to make their calcium carbonate skeleton. If the pH gets low enough (acidic), it will actually dissolve the calcium carbonate skeletons of the corals.

    This is one of the biggest observations/theories as to why vast regions of coral reefs are currently dying. Global warming is causing higher levels of CO2 in the air and water. Interesting enough, eons ago, the atmosphere and water was acidic and no hard corals existed. Then a slow decrease in the CO2 levels occurred allowing nature to develop organisms that could bind calcium and carbonates to build the reefs as we know them today.
    BeakerBob - Past MMMC Club President, current Board Member
    imagephp?u1&amptypesigpic&ampdateline1261894023 - Co2 and Ph?
    Likes MizTanks liked this post

  3. #3
    MizTanks - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    U.P. of Michigan.
    Posts
    7,753
    First Name
    Jamie
    Awards Photo of the Month - October 2012 Photo of the Month Post and Reply Award - Winner of the first PAR Contest. Monthly Giveaway Winner

    Default

    Ok. I was having a small ph issue and I don't like using chemicals to fix it~I left the hood of my all in one, open all night and by morning my ph had risen. I heard this would work but I don't know exactly why it does. Could you explain this to me. I kind a have an idea
    There's nothing like being a Reefer! www.upmmas.com

  4. #4
    EMUreef - Reefkeeper
    IT Guru

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Walled Lake, Michigan
    Posts
    1,030
    Awards March Madness Award - 2013 March Madness Winner Photo of the Month Fishbowl Drawing Winner

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MizTanks View Post
    Ok. I was having a small ph issue and I don't like using chemicals to fix it~I left the hood of my all in one, open all night and by morning my ph had risen. I heard this would work but I don't know exactly why it does. Could you explain this to me. I kind a have an idea
    Fish breath the oxygen thats in water and they give off CO2 which is released into the air which is held inside the hood and dissolved back into the water.

    Why dont you like using chemicals? Also there is a correlation between ph and Carbonate Alk, which is important to corals. Have you tested your alk? I know when my ph was very inconsistent and when i tested my alk was very low.

  5. #5
    BeakerBob - Reefkeeper
    RIP

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan
    Posts
    461
    Awards Photo of the Month Photo of the Month

    Default

    Atmospheric CO2 levels fluctuate between day and night.

    Alkalinity serves as a "buffer" in the water. As a buffer, it helps resist any sudden changes in pH. If your tank has a low alk value, it is more prone to pH swings that may be caused by external environmental factors, such as indoor CO2. It is typical to find higher levels of CO2 in the house during the winter as most people seal up their homes to retain the heat.
    Last edited by BeakerBob; 02-05-2011 at 08:48 PM. Reason: Changed pH to CO2 levels
    BeakerBob - Past MMMC Club President, current Board Member
    imagephp?u1&amptypesigpic&ampdateline1261894023 - Co2 and Ph?
    Likes MizTanks liked this post

  6. #6
    brandeewyne - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    owosso
    Posts
    93
    First Name
    brandee

    Default

    additionally, the pH levels in your system fluctuate between day and night .. that's why it's suggested to test multiple times through the day to get a more accurate idea of where your tank is at. an early morning reading will differ from a mid-afternoon reading. a meter (constant monitoring) is ideal.

    bob, i love the way you explain water chemistry .. you word it so it's so much easier to understand than many of the sites and various other reasources i've used. thank you!


    edit: relative to post correction.
    Last edited by brandeewyne; 02-05-2011 at 09:03 PM.

  7. #7
    BeakerBob - Reefkeeper
    RIP

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan
    Posts
    461
    Awards Photo of the Month Photo of the Month

    Default

    Actually, I have corrected this to read "Atmospheric CO2 levels...."
    BeakerBob - Past MMMC Club President, current Board Member
    imagephp?u1&amptypesigpic&ampdateline1261894023 - Co2 and Ph?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

About CaptiveReefs

    If you are interested in learning about reefkeeping or have a problem with your reef, our reefkeeping community is here to help. Feel free to ask a question or search our site. We have lots of experienced reefkeepers that are willing to provide free reefkeeping advice!

    Besides being a great resource for all levels of reef aquarium hobbyists, CaptiveReefs is a social experience that will enhance your enjoyment of reefkeeping. CaptiveReefs is committed to connecting reefkeepers with the support and information they need to grow beautiful coral reef aquariums.

Information

Connect with Us