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help Nitrates just jumped


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  1. #1
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    Default help Nitrates just jumped

    Hello. I did 3/4 water change on Sunday. Levels all really good afterwards. Today, doing my normal test, PH at 8.2 Nitrite at .50 ammonia 0 Nitrate 40+ Dont know what happened. Tank is a few months old recently added plants to the system so that is why I did the drastic water change (one of them died ; Halymenis Sp. it was nasty to get out cleaned everything pretty good. What should I try now? The fish dont seem to be bothered by the Nitrate spike. The Nitrite is up too not sure why.

  2. #2
    XSiVE - Reefkeeper
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    I would guess a few things, the plant most likely released a lot of bound phosphate and nitrate as it has deteriorated, also, how much sediment did you stir up when you were cleaning the mess up from the dead plant?

  3. #3
    bigbill - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSiVE View Post
    I would guess a few things, the plant most likely released a lot of bound phosphate and nitrate as it has deteriorated, also, how much sediment did you stir up when you were cleaning the mess up from the dead plant?
    + 1 100% agree
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSiVE View Post
    I would guess a few things, the plant most likely released a lot of bound phosphate and nitrate as it has deteriorated, also, how much sediment did you stir up when you were cleaning the mess up from the dead plant?
    it was pretty nasty. We got as much out of the tank as possible. It was quite a chore. There was still a bit of debri in the left over water which has cleared now. Is there something I should be doing that I am missing?

    ---------- Post added at 02:16 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:15 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by XSiVE View Post
    I would guess a few things, the plant most likely released a lot of bound phosphate and nitrate as it has deteriorated, also, how much sediment did you stir up when you were cleaning the mess up from the dead plant?
    it was pretty nasty. We got as much out of the tank as possible. It was quite a chore. There was still a bit of debri in the left over water which has cleared now. Is there something I should be doing that I am missing?

  5. #5
    XSiVE - Reefkeeper
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    now that you're seeing nitrate, which IME means you're seeing the ends of a dissolved compound breaking down not a whole lot you can do.

    suggestions to help the situation: skim wet for a few days, do a water change or two.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSiVE View Post
    now that you're seeing nitrate, which IME means you're seeing the ends of a dissolved compound breaking down not a whole lot you can do.

    suggestions to help the situation: skim wet for a few days, do a water change or two.
    Thankyou. I will try another partial water change.

  7. #7
    bluwc - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    I would be more worried about the ammonia too....you'll prob lose some fish too

  8. #8
    XSiVE - Reefkeeper
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    I hope you get it taken care of! good luck.

    edit: bluewc: he said ammonia 0

  9. #9
    Sir Patrick - Reefkeeper A2 Club Coordinator
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    Along with the dying plant, disturbing a dirty sandbed/substrate is a very common reason for a nitrate spike.

    Do you maintain your substrate?

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