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What is one of the colors on a clownfish? (hint there is a clownfish on the CR logo in the top left corner of the page.)

DIY Copepod Culturing!


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  1. #1
    greg97527 - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Greg

    Post DIY Copepod Culturing!

    Introduction:

    Although some marine fish will breed and grow quite readily in captivity, others are more problematic. One of the major difficulties in breeding these fish is the supply of suitable food for the larvae. In nature, many marine fish depend on copepods as their initial first food, but very few species of marine copepods have been successfully cultivated on a scale that is suitable for use in home aquaculture. Hopefully, this column will provide a basic background into copepod biology and life cycle, as well as provide a simple procedure for growing your own copepods. The procedures described below are taken from a basic understanding of the life requirements of the animal and a practical understanding of what a home hobbyist has access to. In my opinion, copepod cultivation may make an important contribution in home aquaculture, when fish fry are too diminutive to eat rotifers as a first food.

    It is well known that for many species of fish fry live food is essential at the first critical stages of first feedings. In the oceans, potential food items most likely to be encountered by fish larvae are the nauplius stages of copepods. Copepods have probably been important in the diet of many fish during their evolution and effective predation strategies have evolved for capturing copepods as primary foods. Marine copepods are particularly suitable as food for fish fry. The size range (~100uM nauplii to ~1000uM adult) fit into the mouth of many larval fish. Copepod nauplii elicit a strong feeding response from many fish larvae, and Copepods have naturally higher levels of essentially fatty acids.

    Currently the easiest way to supply copepods for home aquaculture is to capture them via netting in the wild; however, since our column focuses on home culture we will explain a simple how-to home culture copepods.


    Copepods:

    Copepods are a class of animals within the larger group Crustacea. The group is diverse, with more than 10,000 different species in many different ecological niches. Copepods occur in most bodies of marine and freshwater. Many copepod species are parasitic, others swim freely as part of the plankton, while still others are benthic (bottom dwelling) or live on or around other organisms. Few free-living copepods exceed 2 mm in length as adults. Three major groups of free-living copepods have been identified: the Calanoida, primarily free swimming planktonic animals, The Cyclopoida, which may be planktonic or demersal, and the Harpacticoida, which are entirely benthic.

    Copepods pass through very distinct life stages. They emerge from an egg as a nauplius, usually 100-150uM in length. After six nauplius stages (referred to as stages N1 to N6), with growth between each stage, the body shape changes and a series of usually six copepodid stages follow (referred to as stages C1 to C6). The last of these stages is the adult in which different sexes can be identified. Reproduction is sexual in nature, and in parts of the sea the nauplius larvae of calanoid copepods are the most abundant metazoan animals.


    Life history and development:

    Fertilized eggs are held in a sac against the urosome of the female. When first released the eggs appear dark brown. As embryos develop the color and shade lightens until the mature embryos appear light brown with a dark eye spot just visible in each. Nauplius larvae emerge from the egg sac and swim freely. Newly released nauplii have up to four or five small lipid droplets regularly arranged in their body cavity. The first nauplius stage (N1) is very brief (a few hours) before the animals metamorphose to N2, then a rapid growth to N6. Following N6, the first copepodid stage (C1) occurs. By this stage the overall body form has changed from the
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  2. #2
    greg97527 - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Default

    bump*
    perhaps this could be stickied, there are alot of people that could benefit from this, especially us mandarin owners.
    It's all about the reef. :YEAH:

  3. #3
    dakar - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Sticky'd and added to the Featured Threads! That will keep it fresh until I get the Reference Library page finsihed and ready.

    How'd I miss this the first time around? Great Bump! Thanks for posting the info Greg!!!!!
    Every electronic device is manufactured with smoke stored deep inside... only a true genius can find a way to set it free.

  4. #4
    greg97527 - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    just trying to help, gonna be settin up a 10 gallon tank this weekend to start it out i think. had to wait for my fuge to explode with pods first
    It's all about the reef. :YEAH:

  5. #5
    jojo22 - Reefkeeper Registered User
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    Thanks alot greg now I have another project to undertake!! Not that that's a bad thing!!!
    Does water always taste like salt and poo????


  6. #6

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    Dakar, I've got this article on my forum with the pictures and stuff. Let me know if you want me to shoot you the code so you can add the pics..

    Eric
    120G Reef and 40B reef at work, 120G tank dry and dirty in the garage.

  7. #7
    dakar - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by perpetual98 View Post
    Dakar, I've got this article on my forum with the pictures and stuff. Let me know if you want me to shoot you the code so you can add the pics..

    Eric
    Pics too? Definately! Hopefully this evening after training things will be quiet and I can get the new pages up.
    Every electronic device is manufactured with smoke stored deep inside... only a true genius can find a way to set it free.

  8. #8
    greg97527 - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Hey bud, just wondering if you have had any time to get the pages up? maybe im retarded and didnt see them lol, just a friendly reminder
    It's all about the reef. :YEAH:

  9. #9
    jojo22 - Reefkeeper Registered User
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    Does water always taste like salt and poo????


  10. #10
    Grue - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    I am thinking of setting up a coped tank. This setup will work but not for me. (Unless I have to do it) I am considering setting up a 10g with a undergravel sand filter with the old style bubble up the tubes for flow. Will this work? Using replaces tank water to start and a bit of live sand from my sump. My whole ideal is to Breed copeds and possible grow some Red tangs delight Macroalge. Any Thoughts? any ideals? Thanks in advance.
    Grue
    Don't Turn off the lights! The Grue's will get you!

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