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DIY Rock Racks


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  1. #1
    Whoyah - Reefkeeper CR Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Grants Pass, OR
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    1,267

    Default DIY Rock Racks

    I tried an idea that I had in my new 65 gallon tank and it turned out great. The idea is really a spin off thing that I have saw other do, Graphixx being one of them. I call then Rock Racks.

    I knew that I wanted good flow through in my new tank and a lot of caves and bridges. I also wanted good strong structure for the my live rock. Here is what I came up with.

    Step 1. I built a rack system out of standard 1/2" PVC. I made sure to leave the ends open to allow air out and water/critters in. Also leave enough room in for the foam skin. One thing I feel that is important is to make "cube" frame instead of just a "table" frame. The foam skin is extremely buoyant. Without the cross pieces on the bottom of the racks to anchor them in the sand, the whole thing can come up out of the water.

  2. #2
    Whoyah - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Sep 2004
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    Grants Pass, OR
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    Default

    Step 2. Cover frame in black pond foam. The foam I used is for securing rocks in outdoor ponds. I bought my can at the local hardware store for like $6.00. I buried the racks in about 2 inches worth of old sand I had. This reduces the amount of foam needed, saving cost and reducing the buoyance. The foam expands when first applied. After I applied some, I came back and smushed the foam down. It kind of pops almost. I spread it around with a paint stick (I think). It puffs up some again and leave a nice lumpy texture. Gloves are a must. It is very sticky stuff.

  3. #3
    Whoyah - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Sep 2004
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    Grants Pass, OR
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    Default

    I let the racks cure for a couple days outside. I also stuck them in a rubbermaid tub of water just for good measure. Here is the finished product.

  4. #4
    Whoyah - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Sep 2004
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    Grants Pass, OR
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    Default

    Step 4. Lay in racks and fill with sand, water, live rock, etc. I filled the bottom tubes of the racks with rubble pieces. I did this for a couple reasons 1) to make them heavier and 2) to give the pods in the tank a place to breed. I have a 3-4" in sand bed so the bare pvc is covered now.

  5. #5
    Whoyah - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Sep 2004
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    Grants Pass, OR
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    Default

    Step 5. Sit back and in enjoy. This after only about a 1 month in the tank. The coraline is already starting to cover sections. I really like they way these turned out. One really handy thing is that frags can be mounted to the rack by simplying jambing them into the foam, almost like a push pin. My zoa frags are little tough but I bet SPS frags would be pretty easy. The fish love it and it make stacking the live rock ton easier.

  6. #6
    RHAPALA - Reefkeeper Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NORTH EAST PA. YES MY TOWN IS REALLY CALLED NORTH EAST
    Posts
    299

    Default

    WOW THIS LOOKS REALLY GOOD NICE JOB

  7. #7
    greg97527 - Reefkeeper CR Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Grants Pass, Oregon
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    595
    First Name
    Greg

    Default

    great idea on the pipe for pod breeding, i may have to try this when i set up the 75 with a 55 fuge
    It's all about the reef. :YEAH:

  8. #8
    graphixx - Reefkeeper CR Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Idaho
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    2,785
    First Name
    Greg

    Default

    shad, I love the set up of the racks that is nice. one thing I would suggest too for others thinking about this. when your applying the final coat of foam, a nice touch that I did that really helped is if you have some old sand I caked the old sand in with the foam. the sand sticks to the foam very easy and gives is a more natural look and as time goes by it seems the sand gets algae and growth on it quicker than the foam.
    fulltankshot 1 - DIY Rock Racks

  9. #9
    eldiente - Reefkeeper CR Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Idaho
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    82

    Default

    That is way cool, nice job!!!

  10. #10
    Whoyah - Reefkeeper CR Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Grants Pass, OR
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    Default

    Thanks!! The coolest part is seeing my yellow tang swim around and through all of the tunnels and out again.

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