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What is one of the colors on a clownfish? (hint there is a clownfish on the CR logo in the top left corner of the page.)

Ricordea!!!


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  1. #1
    ReeferRob - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Default Ricordea!!!

    These are mostly photosynthetic corals, which are approximately 1-4 inches in diameter. They can be round, oval and or hour glass in shape many times having one or more mouths. They are among the easiest of all corals to maintain because they do enjoy somewhat nutrient rich waters. They can be found in all types of colors, form different shades of orange, to blue, green, purple, yellow, gold, lemon lime, pink and any combination under the rainbow. They are not true anemones, nor are they true corals, however, they are somewhere in between or better characterized as a morph.

    It is fairly easy to identify the difference between the two and it can be done in many ways. One of the easier differences to identify is the raised oral cone or opening and the presence or lack there of polyp pimples or tentacles also know as verrucae. The Florida Ricoreda will display a smooth raised oral cone and typically but not always will have a contrasting color to that of the base of the main polyp. Where as the Ricordea yuma will display the verrucae up the raised oral cone up to the opening. Another easy way to identify the differences, but not always accurate is the size and pattern of the verrucae or polyp pimples. Florida Ricordea typically have symmetrical polyps of similar shape and size, where as a Ricordea Yuma will display virrucae in random sizes, shapes and orientation on the main base polyp. I personally have noticed a distinct difference in feeling or touch of the morphs. I find F. Ricordea to be less fibrous or muscle like in touch to the R. Yuma.

    Global Distribution

    The Florida Ricordea and Ricordea Yuma originate from different locations. The Florida Ricordea can be found from the waters of Southern Florida down to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean's. Ricordea Yuma can be found throughout the Indo-Pacific region or "Coral Triangle". Both species can be found in locations that range from shallow sunlit waters to deeper waters where they tend to be less colonial than there shallower counter parts.

    Although Ricoridia are not considered rare there are certain color morphs that are less common and therefor highly sought after. These unique color morphs can fetch top dollar with in the hobby. Ricordea Florida tend to be more common and can be more affordable as they are propagated with in the United States.




    Ricordea in Captivity


    The Florida Ricordea and Ricordea Yuma are very hardy and forgiving species of coral. Through proper care and husbandry they can be kept in our captive reefs for many years. Ricordea will tolerate temperature ranges from 74-84 degrees, and salinity from 1.024-1.027. However, they do best when stable water parameters are maintained.

    Ricordea are not aggressive and make very good tank-mates in just about any reef tank. Avoid placing them too closely to other coral species. It's a good idea to give all the corals in your tank plenty of space to grow to avoid chemical and physical aggression among species.

    Once properly acclimated to your tanks lighting specifics, they can be kept in very different locations throughout your reef. I have mine under T5 lighting at the moment, in all locations in my display. Although Ricordea are mostly photosynthetic, they will respond to tarket feeding. I have found Ricordea to enjoy everything from Rotifers, to zooplankton-like foods such as Cyclop-eeze and baby brine shrimps and even tiny Asterina Stars!

    Both Florida Ricordea and Ricordea Yuma can be kept in low to medium high flow patterns in your reef. Much like acclimation to the light, the polyps will require some acclimation to your flow strength and direction. You will find that some will do quite well in medium to higher flow areas in the tank. And others will require less flow or more subdued currents.

    Propagation

    Propagation is quite easy with Ricoridea. There are natural ways through reproduction of the polyp. As the polyp travels, much like an anemone, it will leave bits of its foot behind to grow out, and they can simply sprout babies. Other ways to propagate this coral can include the use of scissors or an Exacto knife to simply cut the polyp in half or from a rock or parent colony.

    There is also longitudinal or gravitational propagation. This can happen naturally or be induced by man. This form of propagation typically happens when the base or foot of the coral becomes attached to two independent pieces of substrate. The gravitational pull of one of the pieces of substrate forces the polyp to stretch and eventually split into two polyps. I have personally tried all forms of propagation through experimentation, and have found there to be an extremely high success rate for survival.

    Special Thanks for Use of Photos:
    Argent and Coralmorphologic.com

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    Last edited by jimsflies; 03-10-2012 at 06:05 AM.

  2. #2
    jimsflies - Reefkeeper
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    Default

    Great article Rob. Thanks for putting this together for us!

  3. #3
    CR Member
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    Great article Rob.
    I will have to second that Statement.

  4. #4
    Sir Patrick - Reefkeeper A2 Club Coordinator
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    Sweet write up w/ even sweeter pics! Nice job.

    I will be reading this thouroughly- I have always melted any ric I have put in my tanks...

  5. #5
    MizTanks - Reefkeeper
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    What a wonderful way for me to learn about corals~very nice read Rob~thanks!!!
    There's nothing like being a Reefer! www.upmmas.com

  6. #6
    whitetiger61 - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    very nice and informative write up Rob.thanks for shaing that info..rics are one of my favorite corals..

    Rick

  7. #7
    Argent - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    woo woo nice write up and good use of two of my pics! :D
    ~Paul
    -----------------------
    Argent's 24G Aquapod HQI
    Argent Imaging on Flickr

  8. #8
    ReeferRob - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Thanks you guys, just wanted to share some of the love for one of my favorite pieces!
    "We shouldn't think of an environment where livestock can survive, we should ensure an environment where livestock can thrive."-Rabidgoose
    "If it's gonna be that kinda party, Ima stick my ........ in the mashed potatoes!"-Beastie Boys

  9. #9
    Argent - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    I love my rics - want to get more when I can (Trop has a few morphs I want to get my grubby paws on)
    ~Paul
    -----------------------
    Argent's 24G Aquapod HQI
    Argent Imaging on Flickr

  10. #10

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    Nice write up...

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