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Corals Outgrowing their plugs


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  1. #1
    dlhirst - Reefkeeper
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    Don

    Default Corals Outgrowing their plugs

    So, this is probably a stupid question, but what do I do with a couple corals that are overgrowing their plugs, to the point where they are growing up underneath the plug? I have a Favites and a Chalice that have outgrown their plugs. I just noticed that quite a bit of coral is growing up underneath.

    Normally, you'd think lighting would be an issue, but both of these are just stuck in the sand bed, and the snails tend to tip them over... I try to avoid touching either of them, so they get flipped back with a chop stick, usually.

    Do I get a bigger plug? I am not certain I want to glue them to a rock at this time. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    EMUreef - Reefkeeper
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dlhirst View Post
    So, this is probably a stupid question, but what do I do with a couple corals that are overgrowing their plugs, to the point where they are growing up underneath the plug? I have a Favites and a Chalice that have outgrown their plugs. I just noticed that quite a bit of coral is growing up underneath.

    Normally, you'd think lighting would be an issue, but both of these are just stuck in the sand bed, and the snails tend to tip them over... I try to avoid touching either of them, so they get flipped back with a chop stick, usually.

    Do I get a bigger plug? I am not certain I want to glue them to a rock at this time. Any thoughts?
    well if you dont wanna glue them down to rock yet your best bet is to find a bigger frag disc/plug or trying to get some rock rubbble thats bigger than the plug and just glue it to that. Its what i do for my zoa's on my sand bed, has worked great, cause you can kinda push the rock into the sand a bit and they dont get knocked over.

  3. #3
    jimsflies - Reefkeeper
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    Default

    Here is what I would recommend:
    http://www.midwestsaltwater.com/Frag...kqqo1mb63snum4

    I have a couple of these and love them. Keeps the plugs from being tipped over and gives them a place to grow. One the plug encrusts you can always remove it and put a new plug in the center for it to regrow over the plug. Works for every kind of coral.

  4. #4
    MizTanks - Reefkeeper
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    Jamie
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jimsflies View Post
    Here is what I would recommend:
    http://www.midwestsaltwater.com/Frag...kqqo1mb63snum4

    I have a couple of these and love them. Keeps the plugs from being tipped over and gives them a place to grow. One the plug encrusts you can always remove it and put a new plug in the center for it to regrow over the plug. Works for every kind of coral.
    Thanks for the link Jim! Just what I've been looking for, way cool!

    Jamie
    There's nothing like being a Reefer! www.upmmas.com

  5. #5
    cg5071 - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Default

    I have the 20 and the 5 hole frag rock. I love them as well. I have also seen "dougnuts" that are a clay ring with a hole in it and lets your corals encrust a large piece.

    Favites and chalice should be fine really to grow naturally on the sand. They both create their own skeleton.

    I also attach small pieces to medium small rocks so that I can place them or move them as I like. Mainly for zoas.


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  6. #6
    dlhirst - Reefkeeper
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    Default

    They are growing without slowing... but, they seem to be growing underneath, rather than across the sand bed. I am sure it is due to the snails tipping them over every third day or so. So, they never get the chance to attach.

    I will try one of those stations, I guess.

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