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What is one of the colors on a clownfish? (hint there is a clownfish on the CR logo in the top left corner of the page.)

Results: What are the top 3 general questions about captive breeding?

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  • Why is captive breeding important?

    2 14.29%
  • How difficult is captive breeding?

    6 42.86%
  • How do I set up a breeding system?

    10 71.43%
  • What species should I work with?

    3 21.43%
  • Is captive breeding expensive?

    3 21.43%
  • Can I make a living breeding fish?

    4 28.57%
  • Why are captive bred fish more expensive?

    2 14.29%
  • What's the difference between captive bred fish and wild caught?

    0 0%
  • Does captive breeding interfere with fish that are locally caught/collected?

    0 0%
  • Can I breed fish in my reef tank?

    6 42.86%
  • Other - Write In

    3 21.43%
Multiple Choice Poll.

Top 3 Questions You Have About Captive Breeding


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Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    fishtal - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Tal
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    Default Top 3 Questions You Have About Captive Breeding

    What are the top 3 general questions about captive breeding that you would like answered? If you choose Other, please post that question in the thread.
    Save a fish, Breed your own!
    www.fishtalpropagations.com

  2. #2
    thefishgirl - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Grosse Pointe Woods, MI
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    Becky

    Default

    Hey Tal, My questions are centered on feeding the fry that have resulted from captive breeding.

    How many options are there for feeding different types of fry? (And how do you grow it, or can you grow it?)
    How do you know when it's time to move up to the next type of food?

    My personal interest is from a clown fish and banggai perspective, however I know there are many other types of breeders out there, or people considering getting into this side of the hobby, so feel free to expand or (un-expand) on this topic.

  3. #3
    fishtal - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Default

    Hey Becky,

    The topic of larval feeding is huge and very important.

    From a clown and Banggai perspective it's fairly easy... I start my clowns on rotifers and move them to Otohime A around day 5. As they get bigger I move up to finely crushed flake foods and frozen Cyclopeeze.

    I start my Banggai on newly hatched brine shrimp for a couple of weeks and wean them onto the dry and frozen foods mentioned above. (No Otohime A though)

    When to change foods is determined by the size of the larvae, or fry. Keep in mind the size of the food and the size of the fish's mouth.

    It gets complicated with fish that have smaller larvae and longer larval phases. Copepods are a natural food source for larval fishes. Obtaining and culturing them is a bit more difficult.
    Save a fish, Breed your own!
    www.fishtalpropagations.com

  4. #4
    fishtal - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Tal
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    Default

    Chris,

    With Banggai it is possible to do that, depending on your set up, but the best thing to do would be to pull the male around 21-23 days before he releases the juveniles. Juvenile Banggai are pretty fragile and it's best to move them while the male is still holding them. Mine usually spits them out as soon as I net him and put him in the rearing tank. After that I just put him back and start feeding the juveniles.

    As far as angels go, there has been some success with the dwarfs such as flame angels. Larval feeding is the key here as with so many species.
    Save a fish, Breed your own!
    www.fishtalpropagations.com

  5. #5
    FlynnFish - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Warren
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    shanny
    Awards MBI Apprentice - Award nomination from bigbill accepted. Photo of the Month MBI Participant

    Default food

    i would like to know more about the foods available to feed the fry of different species and at the different times. i have a pair of firefish, a mated pair of coral banded shrimp, pair velvet damsels, and lots of different pairs of clowns but i know different things eat different foods. i've raised clarkii clowns but would like to move on to other things.
    shannon
    reef solutions

  6. #6
    fishtal - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chort55 View Post
    Ok cool, maybe I will give it a try. I know Banggai dont do it as frequently as clowns and if I remember reading a while back their #s are taking a big hit from wild collection because of their more infrequent spawnings. Be a good way to help out IMO

    Yeah I know the dwarfs have been successfully done, not easily or often tho unfortunately, and I know they are much more difficult then clowns/ banggai because of the larval stage being longer and requiring a different food as well if I remember right. Maybe someday I will be able to get to that level tho... don't suppose you have come across any good "how to" stuff on breeding angels, ive seen some stuff but most of it just talked about how hard it was to do and low success rates not so much what you need/ how to actually do it!
    Banggai are always good to work with. Captive bred Banggai are much healthier and will live longer than wild caught ones. There is always a market for them too.

    There isn't a lot of angel breeding info out there but there is a bit of info here: MBI Species Classification List

    There is also an article in the most recent Reef Hobbyist magazine written by a friend of mine: Reef Hobbyist Magazine Quarter 1 2011
    Save a fish, Breed your own!
    www.fishtalpropagations.com

  7. #7
    fishtal - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by I8Nemo View Post
    i would like to know more about the foods available to feed the fry of different species and at the different times. i have a pair of firefish, a mated pair of coral banded shrimp, pair velvet damsels, and lots of different pairs of clowns but i know different things eat different foods. i've raised clarkii clowns but would like to move on to other things.
    shannon
    reef solutions
    Shannon,

    You can find more info on different foods here: Culturing and Feeding
    Save a fish, Breed your own!
    www.fishtalpropagations.com

  8. #8
    fishtal - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Tal
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    Default

    Anyone else care to chime in?
    Save a fish, Breed your own!
    www.fishtalpropagations.com

  9. #9
    Mike - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Default Tal. What are some pointers for maximizing survival of larval clown fish / Juveniles

    Tal,

    I am wondering when it comes to doing this what are some things that are often overlooked that may increase the survival rate of larval fish? I have read several things regarding everything from food to PH where the larval and early stages are concerned.

    1. So what Foods are the most nutrient dense and what do you recommend for enriching foods to attain maximum benefit?

    2. What is the Ideal PH range for larval fish? Should we be overly concerned with this?

    3. Are there any "Little" things that are overlooked that you think make a difference???
    anacroporamademepoora
    --Lifetime member of the "No Mud Club".:

  10. #10
    fishtal - Reefkeeper CR Member
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    Tal
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    Default

    I'll see what I can do here...

    1. I'm assuming you're talking about foods for larval fish? The simple answer here is copepods. Rotifers aren't really a good source of nutrition on their own. They work fine for clowns though.

    2. Honestly, I never test pH. pH is important but is usually kept in check with proper husbandry of the larval fish.

    3.(a) Broodstock diet- variety of foods and multiple feedings every day go a long way to producing viable eggs and larvae.

    3.(b) A reliable heater and thermometer will make things a lot more successful.
    Save a fish, Breed your own!
    www.fishtalpropagations.com

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