[Timezone Detection]
Create Account - Join in Seconds!

User Name: Email Address:
Human Verification

What is one of the colors on a clownfish? (hint there is a clownfish on the CR logo in the top left corner of the page.)

help with maxima clam


Bookmark and Share
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default help with maxima clam

    I have a small maxima clam about 2" in length maybe a little longer and lately it hasn't opened at all, sometimes it looks like it wants to but then closes right back up. another thing I noticed was some of the cleanup crew such as hermits and nassarius snails paying extra attention to the clam as if they were trying to get to it somehow. another thing to add would be that my other clam a derasa is perfectly fine. any help or ideas as to what could be the problem would be appreciated.
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  2. #2
    demonclownfish - Reefkeeper CR Member
    Chatbox Menace

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ortonville
    Posts
    1,229
    Awards Monthly Giveaway Winner

    Default

    from what ive seen a derasa can live in a stagnant pool lol. but your maxima is smaller which is one possible reason is it might not be able to get enough food from filtering as clams only go mostly photosynthetic around 3-4" in length and the smaller clams usually will not make it very long without a proper environment.

  3. #3
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default

    wouldnt other things be affected as well if parameters were an issue?, I haven't done anything new

    ---------- Post added at 11:25 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:24 PM ----------

    I was told to feed the smaller ones phytoplankton which is what I have been doing for months
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  4. #4
    demonclownfish - Reefkeeper CR Member
    Chatbox Menace

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ortonville
    Posts
    1,229
    Awards Monthly Giveaway Winner

    Default

    ya i told you to feed it phyto but the question is, are you feeding it enough to where the clam can support itself?

  5. #5
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default

    well I changed up the lighting a week and a half ago, it was fine up until yesterday..I dont dose...I feed it every 2-3 days i tried today and didnt get any response from it
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  6. #6
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default

    no, no dosing all I run is GFO, I just do a standard lighting cycle i have the lights come on a 2pm and gradually get brighter over a few hours then starts getting darker again at 10pm, thunderstorms I have happen occasionally
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  7. #7
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default

    the last thunderstorm that I recall seeing was about 3 days ago its on 25% chance daily, i started running the GFO 2 weeks ago and I just changed it...lights run the brightest at 50% for about 8 hours a day
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  8. #8
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default

    I changed the GFO a few days ago, the lights run 24-7 I just have them very very dim at night
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  9. #9
    redemer123 - Reefkeeper
    Graphic Designer

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    clio michigan
    Posts
    509
    First Name
    Andrew

    Default

    all the lights are on a very low setting like 10%
    It takes a long long time to build a coral reef. Step by step the reefs survive on partnerships. And the most important partners are you and I.

  10. #10
    Tom@HaslettMI - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    East Lansing, MI
    Posts
    1,838
    First Name
    Tom
    Awards Yugo Award - For helping with the CR Booth at MCES Monthly Giveaway Winner Monthly Giveaway Winner Photo of the Month Tank of the Month

    Default a few thoughts.... in no particular order.

    Damaged byssal gland - This is the structure that builds the threads clams use to anchor to the substrate. If the gland is damaged a clam will continue to live for a handful of months then either gap and die or close up and die. If you've had the clam for 6+ months and not forcibly moved it lately then this is unlikely.

    Irritation - A CUC messing with the clam will keep it from opening. But once the irritation has stopped a healthy clam should open up within a few minutes. If the clam is on the sand bed you might consider moving it up onto the rocks. This will keep the snails away from it. And as for the hermits... I would just get rid of the them altogether. IMHO hermits have no place in a reef tank.

    Parameters - Small clams especially maximas are delicate. The other corals/inverts in your system may not be as sensitive at the clam. I would suggest checking your alkalinity as I have seen clams show signs of stress while hardier SPS look fine. That said I have no idea what else you have in your reef.

    Light spectrum - If your bulbs are old a small maxima would likely show signs of stress long before a derasa.

    Light intensity - A maxima need a lot more light than a derasa. What kind of PAR is the maxima receiving?

    Food - This is where I disagree with standard reef hobbyist information. While food plays a role in all clam species nutrition there is research that suggests different species of Tridacna clams rely less on filter feeding than others With the shallow-water species (such as maximas) relying more on light and less on filter feeding.

    I'm sure there is more but that's what I can come up with right now.

    A couple questions:
    • Is the clam still showing signs of growth? It would be especially troubling if it is not.
    • Have you checked for pyramid snails?
    • could you post a picture or two?



    HTH,
    Tom

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Similar Topics

  1. New Stock Purple Maxima and Super Ultra Polynesian Maxima Clams Just Posted!
    By PacificEastAquaculture in forum Pacific East Aquaculture
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-16-2013, 01:46 PM
  2. maxima clam
    By demonclownfish in forum Invert Index
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-02-2011, 08:34 PM
  3. Varsity Blues Maxima Clam
    By larryandlaura in forum Coral Collector
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-29-2011, 07:54 PM
  4. Maxima Clam Update
    By PacificEastAquaculture in forum Pacific East Aquaculture
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-27-2011, 06:30 PM
  5. Shrimp Finally took the maxima clam plunge
    By dakar in forum Other Marine Life
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 03-21-2005, 10:52 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

About CaptiveReefs

    If you are interested in learning about reefkeeping or have a problem with your reef, our reefkeeping community is here to help. Feel free to ask a question or search our site. We have lots of experienced reefkeepers that are willing to provide free reefkeeping advice!

    Besides being a great resource for all levels of reef aquarium hobbyists, CaptiveReefs is a social experience that will enhance your enjoyment of reefkeeping. CaptiveReefs is committed to connecting reefkeepers with the support and information they need to grow beautiful coral reef aquariums.

Information

Connect with Us