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What type of fish is in the middle of CaptiveReefs (top left corner of page...hint it is the main character in Finding Nemo) )

How can you tell?


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  1. #1
    MizTanks - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    U.P. of Michigan.
    Posts
    7,762
    First Name
    Jamie
    Awards Photo of the Month - October 2012 Photo of the Month Post and Reply Award - Winner of the first PAR Contest. Monthly Giveaway Winner

    Default How can you tell?

    Having just read an article about Tridacna Crocea clams and the effects of lighting. I now have a question When I look at my clam from top down the coloring is very vibrant and blue but with some browning. Yet when I look at it straight on it looks much duller. What coloring do I go by when deciding if it's getting enough light or not?

    The article stated that if the clam is showing a lot of browning or spots, it is then getting to much light. I've always assumed my clam wasn't getting enough light under my t5HO's. I'm so confused
    There's nothing like being a Reefer! www.upmmas.com

  2. #2
    CalmSeasQuest - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Brighton, MI
    Posts
    891
    First Name
    Thomas
    Awards Nano Contest Winner - Winner of 2012 Nano Contest

    Default

    All Tridacna clams look more colorful from the top (at least all that I have seen.) Your's is a Tridacna crocea - Once acclimated, you cannot give it too much light.

    Here's Live Aquaria's take on Croceas...

    Tridacna crocea are relatively hardy clams, and require intense lighting and good water flow in the home aquarium. Proper water chemistry is very important, and they will thrive when calcium levels of 380- 450 mg/L, alkalinity level of 8-11 dKH, and magnesium level of 1280-1350 ppm are maintained.
    The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man. - George Bernard Shaw

  3. #3
    binford4000 - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    farmington hills mi
    Posts
    1,979
    First Name
    Old man
    Awards Tank of the Month - May 2012 Tank of the Month

    Default

    I agree with CSQ,it's really hard to give a clam to much light. Flow is very important also. Not blasting flow tho just a nice consitant flow. Your T5's should be more then enough as long as you keep up with the bulb changes. Another very important thing is to feed your clams! I know these things you already know just adding a little more is all. I always look for the clams not opening. This is a sure sign your clams having a hard time and look for the start of the tissue separation. If you see these or real change in color as stated then you know it's chowder time.!

  4. #4
    MizTanks - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    U.P. of Michigan.
    Posts
    7,762
    First Name
    Jamie
    Awards Photo of the Month - October 2012 Photo of the Month Post and Reply Award - Winner of the first PAR Contest. Monthly Giveaway Winner

    Default

    It's actually doing quit well, 9 months now I just want it up off the LR due to the freaking bristle worms and would like to give it a little more light. I think the Tonga branches just may be the way to go. I'll make a nice upwards extension, cover it with some zoa's (got plenty of those) and it'll be the focal point of the tank
    There's nothing like being a Reefer! www.upmmas.com

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