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Toadstool Division


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  1. #1
    dlhirst - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Detroit MI
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    705
    First Name
    Don

    Default Toadstool Division

    This guy appears to be dividing on his own. Can I speed up the process? The cap is mostly two distinct forms now, and you can see the trunk is branching... Would it suffer either half much if I divided the trunk with a razor? Sharp scissors? yje6eper - Toadstool Division

  2. #2
    dlhirst - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Detroit MI
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    705
    First Name
    Don

    Default

    I know, its a crappy picture I took with a phone. The ufos are reflections from the flash, I think. I took the picture when the lights were out... once they come on, this guy fills out huge, and you can't even see the two distinct parts any more...

  3. #3
    CR Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Haslett
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Others may have additional info to add -

    I've successfully propagated softies/leathers by slowly "strangling" them where I want them to divide - usually with a cable tie that I adjust a bit tighter on a periodic basis.

    I've also successfully propagated softies/leathers by cutting them with a clean sharp knife or fragging scissors (remind me of surgical scissors). In this scenario - any cutting I've done has been outside of my display tank, so that the resulting toxins released by the animal being under stress are on in the main system. And I'll often do a few water changes in the isolated holding container post separation before putting back into the display tank (over an hour or so - being mindful to drops in water temp).

    I'm not sure if the rock these are on can be taken out of the tank to cut them apart - but if it's not, you might try using a popsicle stick or something of the like to gently apply constant pressure between the two sections until it starts to further divide on its own.

  4. #4
    jimsflies - Reefkeeper
    Admin/Founder

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Michigan
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    11,462
    First Name
    Jim

    Default

    Just take a razor blade and cut it. If you want to attach it, you can use a technique like I used with my sinularia. I used the notched plug method with my toadstool as well and it was attached in a week. I think you could get by with a tooth pick instead of the gum picks I used. Toadstools aren't as slimly and less apt to slip off the pick.

    Soft Coral Frags - Notched Plug Method

    You'll have to get your hands on one of those cool Inland saws to do it though.

  5. #5
    binford4000 - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    farmington hills mi
    Posts
    2,214
    First Name
    Old man
    Awards Tank of the Month - May 2012 Tank of the Month

    Default

    I use a pair of scissors to cut toad stools. Works just fine. One thing to consider with toadstools is some of them release toxins when they are damaged to protect themselves . It is best to remove it from the display and then cut it and put it in some water and then rinse it. The notch plugs work really well. We also use rock rubble. You simply take two small rocks and sandwhich the frag between them. Then use a rubberband to hold them together. The frag will attaché to one of the rocks in a week or two

  6. #6
    dlhirst - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Detroit MI
    Posts
    705
    First Name
    Don

    Default

    I've been using a sharp paring knife. Works fine.

  7. #7
    dlhirst - Reefkeeper
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Detroit MI
    Posts
    705
    First Name
    Don

    Default

    309f54774346e394812a6288b019a596 - Toadstool Division

    This is what it looks like today. I've cut off full-sized pieces 3 or 4 times since this first posted. You probably recognize some of its neighbors, Chuck!

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